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How to get a job working for the federal public service

Four public servants -- and former graduate students -- who found careers in the federal public service through the Recruitment of Policy Leaders program share their experiences. Learn about how to follow in their footsteps and become immersed in the world of policy-making.

Career Corner 2009

 

Presenters: (From left to right): Mark Schaan, senior policy analyst, Industry Canada; Hubert Carrier, senior policy and research analyst, Canadian Heritage; Katherine Burke, senior policy aadvisor, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada; Mark Matz, senior policy aadvisor, Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.

Moderator: Owren Howlett, PhD candidate, Carleton University.

What Public Servants Can't do (7:48)


0:00 - 1:24   Public servants can't be advocates
1:24 - 2:25   Longer perspectives
2:25 - 4:41   Being able to work when there's imperfect info
4:41 - 5:21   Working without parameters
5:21 - 7:48   Recruitment & language training

 

The transition from school to government (6:58)


0:00 - 0:50   Surprises when transitioning
0:50 - 4:03   Decision-making is not up to you
4:03 - 6:58   You are not alone

 

Adapting to the world of policy (9:04)


0:00 - 2:12   Your ideas are not new
2:12 - 3:30   You are not an advocate
3:30 - 5:18   You will bring a different perspective
5:18 - 9:04   The government hiring process

 

The application process (8:18)


0:00 - 1:40   The application process
1:40 - 4:21   The love of working for the government
4:21 - 5:58   You get to think for a living
5:58 - 8:18   It is not necessarily a "job for life"

 

The Recruitment of Policy Leaders Program (9:00)


0:00 - 1:51   Recruitment requirements
1:51 - 7:50   The skills and requirements needed
7:50 - 9:00   Other ways to get recruited

 

A Day in the Life of a Public Servant (9:02)


0:00 - 2:46   Files vs. programs
2:46 - 4:16   Core tasks
4:16 - 6:26   Research careers
6:26 - 8:12   Career trajectories
8:12 - 9:02   Leadership roles

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Comments on this Article

This is a great resource and format. I've retweeted it for our students. I really like the way you've chunked up the videos so people can decide which sections are useful to them.

Posted by Elizabeth Monier-Williams, Jun 10, 2010 11:50 AM


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