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The Black Hole

Quarterly Summary: Record-setting number of guest posts

BY DAVID KENT | APR 08 2014

It’s taken nearly five years to build the Black Hole blog up to the point where we are having regular input from more than me + 1 (first Beth Snow and now Jonathan Thon) so this quarter it was especially nice to see numerous guest posts including a returning guest blogger. The goal of the blog has always been to have early career researchers writing about and researching topics that are near and dear to their hearts in order to get their issue a wider exposure (our blog’s readership includes funding agencies (national and international), university administrators, academics and policy makers in addition to hundreds of early career researchers).

I hope this month’s contributions will inspire others to step forward with their take on the education and training of early career researchers in the coming months. In the meantime, please browse through this quarter’s posts:

Guest Authors:  

Sonja B.

Kelly Holloway

Mark Lawson

Regular Authors:

Jonathan

Dave

Top 5 posts this quarter were:

As always, if you have any advice or comments regarding the site – please get in touch at contact@scienceadvocacy.org as Jonathan and I are always looking for creative ways to explore new (and old!) topics. We hope that 2014 has started well for everyone.

ABOUT DAVID KENT
David Kent
Dr. David Kent is a principal investigator at the York Biomedical Research Institute at the University of York, York, UK. He trained at Western University and the University of British Columbia before spending 10 years at the University of Cambridge, UK where he ran his research group until 2019. His laboratory's research focuses on the fundamental biology of blood stem cells and how changes in their regulation lead to cancers. David has a long history of public engagement and outreach including the creation of The Black Hole in 2009.
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