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The Black Hole

Quarterly summary and Happy New Year!

BY DAVID KENT | JAN 07 2013

Happy 2013 to our readers!

We’ll start this year with a summary of our autumnal posts capturing the third quarter of activity at our new University Affairs home. Both Jonathan and I have enjoyed the transition and are looking forward to a year packed with good discussion and constructive solutions. We have several guest posts lined up that will be interspersed throughout the year, but also encourage others who feel passionately about particular issues related to education and training of scientists to get in touch at contact@scienceadvocacy.org.

October-December blog posts: 

Guest Post – Banting Award winner

Jonathan

Dave

The two most popular posts by far this past autumn were Jonathan’s on gender bias and our guest post on the Banting awards. Much discussion ensued on both. On the former, Lorne challenged Jonathan on whether or not we’d make the same choices if no constraints existed; and on the latter about the Banting awards, the discussion got quite lively, with ideas aplenty and the challenging question of whether or not Canada should have pre-PI awards.

We hope that everyone is feeling refreshed after a good Christmas break and shares our enthusiasm for 2013. We always look forward to hearing from our readers in the comments below and in guest posts.

Dave and Jonathan

ABOUT DAVID KENT
David Kent
Dr. David Kent is a principal investigator at the York Biomedical Research Institute at the University of York, York, UK. He trained at Western University and the University of British Columbia before spending 10 years at the University of Cambridge, UK where he ran his research group until 2019. His laboratory's research focuses on the fundamental biology of blood stem cells and how changes in their regulation lead to cancers. David has a long history of public engagement and outreach including the creation of The Black Hole in 2009.
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